Introduction

 

“I return to Montreal sometime around the year 1976: the time is ripe to declare Quebec’s’ independence. The Maritime Provinces join with us and so does Manitoba. I take command of the troops and lead the army to victory. I now live in a country that is catholic and canadien.”, Pierre Trudeau, from the book “Young Trudeau” by Nemni and Nemni 

 

This is a look at the development of Apartheid in South *Afrika and the parallel to Apartheid in Canada. Quebec insists it will live apart from the Rest of Canada (RoC) but uses blackmail to seize anything it demands. *Europeans spell Africa whereas Afrikans spell the name with a “K” and the Afrikaans language with two A’s.

 

Conflicts between Quebec and the RoC increased under Premier Pauline Marois, sworn in 19 Sept 2012. She spared no effort to strain the seams of Canadian fabric, while she continued to cut toward separation. When Marois leapt out of the shadows to announce a premature 7 April 2014 election there was great interest in the upcoming vote results. Pauline, with her nose in the air, expected Quebec voters would elect her to a majority Party Quebecois (PQ) to replace her minority governing PQ. Pundits, both pro and con, thought that this could be a decisive battle. Some even postulated that it would form the equivalent of a final referendum. Poll results were announced. Quebec voters turfed Marois and her PQ party out on their ears. Arrogance turned into snarling humiliation.

 

The Quebec Liberals won and formed a majority government. From that election, could we expect to see an improvement in relations through adherence and belief of equality for all Quebecers? Would the Liberals restore human rights as stated under the Canadian and United Nations rights and freedoms Acts? Would the culture of crime and corruption lose its sanctuary in Quebec? Would the return of the Liberal party to Quebec herald a positive healing force, or would the apartness still simmer? Will a new government direction move towards Quebec self-sufficiency? Quebec needs to implement action plans to prevent the further spread of their economic, social, legal, and political decay.

 

Majority winner Philippe Couillard of the Quebec Liberal party was sworn in as the new premier on April 23, 2014 He was immediately accosted by reporters asking embarrassing questions about the fresh allegations of illegal fund raising by the Liberal party. More bad news came from the Quebec corruption squad who identified collusion and corruption of the Liberals under previous Liberal Premier Jean Charest. To be fair, ousted Quebec PQ Premier Pauline Marois was also under a cloud of suspicion for refusing to appear at a hearing in regards to her husband, Claude Blanchet’s money dealings with the Quebec Federation of Labor. A phone tap recorded union execs saying they wanted Pauline to put an end to the damaging Charbonneau Commission into Quebec organized crime.

 

What tools are required to extract Quebec and Canada from the malignant decline into Apartheid? When you are incensed, pick up your pen to write to your Member of Parliament demanding changes. Your hand written letter is more important than any petition signature or form letter. Be sure to CC our Prime Minister Harper. No postage is required, but if you want assurance of delivery, register the letter at the post office.


To: The Right Honourable Stephen Harper
Prime Minister of Canada
Office of the Prime Minister
80 Wellington St.
Ottawa, On K1A 0A2

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